Dear reader,

This blog helps the scientist who presents learn new skills. It complements the book “When the scientist presents”. Comments and questions are welcome, just email me: jllebrun @ gmail dot com.

I also keep the following pages (More details? See rest of post)
Continue reading “Dear reader,”

004 Keeping to time

Saved by the bell? Not the presenter.  You may be cut off mid-sentence by the chairperson if you exceed the given presentation time . Your punch line  may never be heard. Where in your presentation are you most likely to drift? And how do you prevent drifting? Find out from our podcast experts, Dr Sinclair and Dr Curry.

003 The chairperson and the presenter

What is the relationship between a chairperson and a presenter? What can the presenter expect from a chairperson?

Find out from a chairperson, Dr Mark Sinclair.

002David Peebles’ argument

Depth of Conviction counts more than height of logic, and enthusiasm is worth more than knowledge.

This quote attributed to David Peebles may not seem to apply to the scientist who presents. After all, Science is all logic and knowledge. The enthusiastic exclamation mark always rises someone’s eyebrows when it appears in a scientific paper, and the deep seated down to earth conviction is rarely born from height of logic.

Our two guests on this second podcast give their opinion.

001What does the audience remember

What do people in the audience remember once your presentation is over? The answer may surprise you! Our two guests, Dr. Mark Sinclair and Dr. Alastair Curry share their experience. Dr. Sinclair suggests that the presenter, not just the audience, may also be given something to remember. Early in his career, one insightful question from a friendly questioner led to a breakthrough in his research. Now is your chance to be my next guest on this podcast by adding your comments. Here are my questions to you.

What do you usually remember two days after a scientific talk?

Which talks where particularly memorable to you? Why?

Do you agree with Dr Sinclair’s statement that the presentations “that don’t take you to the [presenter’s] paper, they fade away; they’re gone […] in just a day or two”?

My Podcast Alley feed! {pca-20707d74f1a9238af9d0cea5685c6d5f}