Scientific Presentations and Chinese Proverbs – part 2

Source: Flick; Author: Rob Well.

“A road is traced by the people who walk on it.”

Acknowledge others, the people who inspired you, gave you ideas. There is always a way to acknowledge someone in a presentation. Your road may still be a path, but someone cleared some branches already!

“what touches cinnabar turns to red, what touches ink, turns to black.”

A presentation is made from a painter’s palette. With distinct colors, you create a blend, a color gradient. Each new slide is different yet never far apart from its neighbors. Each new slide is fluidly linked to other colors in the palette. Work on your oral slide transitions. Avoid discontinuitiesUse B keys or black slides also.

“An ax cannot hew it’s own handle.”

Your main concern is to have others use what you have discovered. You provide the steel, they provide the handle. Your presentation should conclude with a clear statement of the significance of your work for others – their handle.

“One lie only, and one hundred deeds are now in doubt.”

In presentations, whatever you declare upfront to describe the significance of the problem and the need for a solution, has to be unquestionable, credible, rock solid. Any exaggeration (lie by amplification), or omission (lie by hiding), and your audience will now have reservations and treat your future claims with scepticism.

“No sooner has someone come that satisfaction is due.”

The audience had a choice not to attend your talk. People have come for a reason. Understand why they came, what they need, and satisfy them. You are now in debt.

“Better act with your hands once than to look with your eyes a thousand times.”

How does an audience act with hands during your talk? People raise arms  to ask questions. Each question is an opportunity for the deeper understanding that precedes adoption and action. Always leave ample time for questions. An audience who only looks at slides without moving to the next stage – is worthless to you. And by the way, use your hands, stretch them in an open gesture to ask for questions, don’t just look at the audience waiting for questions!

By Jean-luc lebrun